TITLE

There’s a God for That

SUBTITLE

Optimism in the Face of Earthquakes, Tsunamis and Meltdowns

AUTHOR

Joseph Honton

PUBLISHER

Frankalmoigne, Sebastopol

GENRE

Narrative nonfiction

BOOKSTORE SUBJECTS

TRAVEL / Asia / Japan

RELIGION / Shintoism

POLITICAL SCIENCE / Peace

CATALOGING-IN-PUBLICATION

1. Japan – Religious life and customs

2. Earthquakes – Japan

3. Tsunamis – Japan

4. Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (Japan) Accidents

5. Antinuclear movement

6. Ghost stories, Japanese

NOVELIST APPEAL

STORYLINE: Issue-oriented

PACE: Relaxed

TONE: Moving; Reflective

WRITING: Lyrical; Thoughtful; Richly detailed; Stylistically complex

PAGES / WORDS

xvi, 168pp, glossary

40,000 words

MAPS / ILLUSTRATIONS

12 maps, 2 line drawings

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CONTROL NUMBER

2012940666

ISBN

978-0-9856423-0-3 (hardcover)

978-0-9856423-1-0 (pbk.)

978-0-9856423-2-7 (eBook)

978-0-9856423-3-4 (Kindle)

PRICE

US $28.00 (hardcover)

US $16.00 (pbk.)

US $11.99 (eBook)

US $9.99 (Kindle)

AVAILABLE FROM

Wholesale: Ingram

Retail: Frankalmoigne

PUBLICATION DATE

October 2012

There's a god for that

So rapid were the changes that few of the leaders took time to reflect on how to guide the newly reorganized country in harmony with the past. And not all of the changes were good: the shrines would suffer the consequences.

Ambition and pride swelled to produce a militaristic leadership, which subverted the new state-sponsored religion, using it to promote views of ethnocentric supremacy. With this, they waged pre-emptive campaigns in the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-95 and the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05. A new generation of leaders, in 1931, installed a puppet government in Manchuria. And ethnic zealotry culminated in the Sino-Japanese War of 1937 and the Pacific War (WWII) of 1941-45.

This dark period ended with the Japanese surrendering to the American Forces in 1945. The final capitulation though, was predicated on the emperor’s retaining his title. To allow for this, and yet to prevent a recurrence of fanaticism, a new constitution was promulgated, under which the state sponsorship of shrines was dismantled.

Fortunately, this forced separation of religious sponsorship was not as devastating as opponents first thought it might be. Local communities picked up some of the financial burden and worshipers returned to supporting shrine activities on a voluntary basis. Financially, the post-World War II picture began to look much like the pre-Meiji picture.

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